31 7 / 2014

21 7 / 2014

I know this came out a week ago, but it’s so good

20 7 / 2014

"Little girl, a memory without blot or contamination must be an exquisite treasure — an inexhaustible source of refreshment: is it not?"

Mr. Rochester, Jane Eyre

10 7 / 2014

alexainslie:

Papers for Characters

(Source: designtaxi.com, via bookishcompendium)

25 6 / 2014

"We read to know we’re not alone. We read because we are alone. We read and we are not alone. We are not alone."

11 6 / 2014

28 5 / 2014

"The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart."

23 5 / 2014

Damnnnn. Are we sure Ray Bradbury wrote Fahrenheit 451 in the 1950s? Because it’s pretty friggen spot on for 2014. Society being completely obsessed with and hypnotized by technology? Check. Government censorship constantly revoking the most basic of human rights? Double check.This dystopian tale of fireman Guy Montag and his journey to enlightenment through literature was bleak at times, but overall I felt incredibly inspired by Bradbury’s final message about the bibliophilic community. No one person can read all the books, but through conversations and relationships and dialogues and sharing and love, humanity must pass along the most pertinent tales in order to learn and grow.I also found myself drawn to this quote toward the end of the book:

"Everyone must leave something behind when he dies, my grandfather said. A child or a book or a painting or a house or a wall built or a pair of shoes made. Or a garden planted. Something your hand touched some way so your soul has somewhere to go when you die, and when people look at that tree or that flower you planted, you’re there. It doesn’t matter what you do, he said, so long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that’s like you after you take your hands away.” 

Not to be morbid, but keep this in mind when designing my funeral program, Bagshaw.g

Damnnnn. Are we sure Ray Bradbury wrote Fahrenheit 451 in the 1950s? Because it’s pretty friggen spot on for 2014. Society being completely obsessed with and hypnotized by technology? Check. Government censorship constantly revoking the most basic of human rights? Double check.

This dystopian tale of fireman Guy Montag and his journey to enlightenment through literature was bleak at times, but overall I felt incredibly inspired by Bradbury’s final message about the bibliophilic community. No one person can read all the books, but through conversations and relationships and dialogues and sharing and love, humanity must pass along the most pertinent tales in order to learn and grow.

I also found myself drawn to this quote toward the end of the book:

"Everyone must leave something behind when he dies, my grandfather said. A child or a book or a painting or a house or a wall built or a pair of shoes made. Or a garden planted. Something your hand touched some way so your soul has somewhere to go when you die, and when people look at that tree or that flower you planted, you’re there. It doesn’t matter what you do, he said, so long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that’s like you after you take your hands away.” 

Not to be morbid, but keep this in mind when designing my funeral program, Bagshaw.

g

08 5 / 2014

"You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who’ll decide where to go."

                            


A toast to Bagshaw: NYU’s newest (and prettiest) (and wittiest) graduate. I am so fucking proud of you. 

06 5 / 2014

"He said that if culture is a house, then language was the key to the front door; to all the rooms inside. Without it, he said, you ended up wayward, without a proper home or a legitimate identity."